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Pupil Premium Statement

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Use of pupil premium 2016-17

The pupil premium is allocated to schools in respect of children from low-income families who are currently known to be eligible for Free School Meals (FSM) and children who have been looked after by the local authority for more than six months. This applies to mainstream as well as special schools. The reason the Government gives school pupil premium money is because there is National evidence that pupils from low income families do less well at school than other pupils.

Schools are free to spend the Pupil Premium as they see fit to support pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds in making good progress at school.

Our School

In the financial year 2016-2017 Oaklands has received £35,110  for pupil premium which represents funding for 34 pupils of £935 each

This year at Oaklands the pupil premium money is being used in the following ways according to individual pupil needs and motivations;

  • Provision of  additional 1:1 tuition in literacy and numeracy from teachers or teaching assistants
  • Provision of 1:1 vocational activities including  vocational woodwork and job coaching on employer premises
  • Provision of 1:1 personal training from a qualified sports coach
  • Provision of music therapy
  • Enhanced lunchtime staffing to enable us to extend the activities available to our pupils over the lunch period. Clubs include a choir and drumming club and cheer leading.

Pupil Premium data 2016 - 2017

Oaklands chose to use the pupil premium grant to target eligible students with specific interventions that would benefit their communication skills, confidence and well-being as well as overall academic progress.  The lunchtime clubs helped to promote social communication and build self-esteem by allowing students to express themselves in less formal settings than the classroom, make choices and interact with other students.

The one to one personal training has been a success for all students in terms of stamina and fitness and helping students sustain concentration.  Weight loss was not the primary goal but this was very successful for 5 out of the 6 students who took part.

Music therapy uses music to help students to develop confidence to initiate or maintain eye contact, build a relationship with other people, improve articulation of speech, decrease anxiety or tension and to develop the ability to listen.

Extra lunchtime sessions in Design Technology helped to develop fine motor and gross motor skills, develop concentration and listening skills and build self-esteem by building/creating a lasting piece of hand crafted work.

Some students benefited from enhanced staff ratios in the classroom or equipment which was beneficial to their well-being or their learning.

Data analysed July 2017

INTERVENTION USED

NUMBER OF PUPILS WHO ACCESSED

PERCENTAGE MAKING EXPECTED PROGRESS

(overall average English and Maths)

PERCENTAGE EXCEEDING EXPECTED PROGRESS

(overall average English and Maths)

BELOW EXPECTED PROGRESS

(overall average English and Maths))

Lunch clubs dance
(All year)

1

66%

34%

 

Lunch club music
(All year)

15

72%

28%

 

Personal Training one to one
(All year)

4

71%

29%

 

Music therapy
(All year)

4

87%

13%

 

DT lunch session
 (All year)

9

77%

21%

2%
(1 student)
 

Additional focussed tuition
(All year)

18

68%

30%

1%
(1 student)

Equipment

3

 

100%